#NIFF film THEIR FIRST MISUNDERSTANDING 1911 mary_pickford silent films 1926 DJ Grauman, Dorothy Gish editor Christel Schmidt june 19 – 22 2014 ontario canada


#NIFF  film THEIR FIRST MISUNDERSTANDING 1911  mary_pickford silent films 1926 DJ Grauman, Dorothy Gish editor Christel Schmidt june 19 - 22 2014 ontario canada

#NIFF film THEIR FIRST MISUNDERSTANDING 1911 mary_pickford silent films 1926 DJ Grauman, Dorothy Gish editor Christel Schmidt june 19 – 22 2014 ontario canada


#NIFF film THEIR FIRST MISUNDERSTANDING 1911 mary_pickford silent films 1926 DJ Grauman, Dorothy Gish editor Christel Schmidt june 19 – 22 2014 ontario canada

the idea girl says

silent films are the best because they HAD to use facial expressions and acting techniques to tell the story. It’s a GOOD thing for an actor to study, learn how to express yourself in face, as well as verbally and you’ll become a super star!

Audiences of all ages will find this intriguing to watch how the FIRST films were made in 1911 (black and white).

quote from blog

O Canada! Birthplace of America’s Sweetheart! Silent film fans know immediately that moniker belongs to only one person–the immortal Mary Pickford. Named as such by D. J. Grauman, the father of Sid of Grauman’s Chinese fame, Pickford was such a prominent representation of America to the world at one time that, in 1926, Dorothy Gish reported that a London school girl said “Mary Pickford” when asked what the initials “M.P.” meant. Most would have expected the British girl to answer “Member of Parliament.” Pickford, however, was closer to the Empire than that girl probably knew. For America’s Sweetheart was actually born in Toronto, Canada.

It is more than appropriate, then, that a long, lost, and important Pickford film, Their First Misunderstanding (1911) should be receiving its first festival screening in Canada at Niagara Integrated Film Festival (NIFF).

NIFF is delighted to screen this important film, which, according to Christel Schmidt, editor of the excellent book, “Mary Pickford, Queen of the Movies,” was considered lost for decades until it was found in a barn in New Hampshire by a carpenter named Peter Massie.

This post was Reprinted from Classic Images magazine, Rare Sightings, by Robert E. Tevis.

http://niagarafilmfest.com/their-first-misunderstanding/

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